Elizabeth Holmes and Theranos

Not many people know about Elizabeth Holmes, the world’s youngest female billionaire.

Her California based laboratory testing company, called Theranos, is revolutionizing the world of diagnostic medicine. What is more interesting is that, like many other billionaires, she happens to have dropped of college to pursue her passion for creating a highly efficient, cheap system for diagnosing diseases (in fact with a single drop of blood at a fraction of price offered by the mainstream labs).

Find out more about her here.

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What religion really means

Today we associate the word religion with ‘belief system’ or ‘religious organizations’. In fact we unobtrusively picture Hindu, Christian, Buddhist, Muslim, Jain etc. worldviews as soon as we hear the word. Yet its true meaning is far different and simpler than that.

So what does Religion actually mean?

The word religion comes from the latin religiō which means conscientiousness, sanctity, reverence, scrupulousness. Thus you don’t have to be following a belief system to be religious. 

There is a tendency these days to consider science and religion as if they are opposites when in fact,

Science can be your religion. Sounds contradictory, but it’s not!

Let us not corrupt the use of this word.

Bibliography
Acharya S. http://freethoughtnation.com/please-respect-my-religion/

Religion Etymology http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/religion#Etymology

Into the future with Orion

On December 05, 2014, the Orion capsule successfully completed its flight test having spent 4.5 hours on the Earth’s orbit and then splashing into the Pacific Ocean, 600 miles southwest from San Diego. It is designed to take humans into outer space and preferably Mars.

NASA’s plan is to launch the Orion on Space Launch System (SLS), the most powerful rocket ever built for the Exploration Mission.

This reminds me of Arthur C. Clarke’s work’s and what he envisaged more than 40 years might not be that far away after all. I mean it is one thing to be a reader of science fiction and space travel but to actually DO it is a different story and a truly breathtaking one.

Click here to find out more.

The Slow Journey Of Wheel

800px-A_Wheel_in_Kudumiyanmalai_Temple
A Wheel in Kudumiyanmalai Temple. Source: Wikimedia Commons

It is not the wheel itself, but the problem of rotation that’s dogged our minds for thousands of years – John Lienhard

He must have first observed it in the wild, and many times during the Paleolithic (2.6 m – 10,000 ya) the much less strenuous movement of the rolling tree log; something that must have been puzzling and tantalizing while he himself was left to haul for example the prey that was captured hundreds of meters outside his dwelling.

Astonishingly, however, it was not until about 3500 BC that he was able to leverage his knowledge of the mechanics to invent the wheel for good. If that does not sound odd then consider the fact that the first stone tools were invented around 2.6 mya, the hand axes and choppers around 700,000 ya and as we already know (from the most important discovery of man part I), the evidence of the first controlled fire dates back around 1 mya. The paintings, sculptors, carvings and other prehistoric all flourished during the Paleolithic.

And yet, it was not until 3500 BC, 6500 years after the agricultural revolution that wheels were developed by the Sumerians of Mesopotamia. This is only 900 years before the Pyramids of Egypt were built. As Natalie Wolchover of Scientific American writes, “The tricky thing about the wheel is not conceiving of a cylinder rolling on its edge. It’s figuring out how to connect a stable, stationary platform to that cylinder.”.

Since being able to use wheels for transportation is one of the greatest achievements man has made, it is interesting to think that we lacked the successful mechanics for a staggeringly long time. Had it co-evolved, for example, with stone tools and art, several hundred thousand years ago it is certain that the world would be vastly different from what it is now, and most likely thousands of years ahead of where we stand today.

Bibliography

Natalie Wolchover (2012). Why it took so long to invent the wheel. Scientific American.
http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/why-it-took-so-long-to-inv/

Wheel History.
http://www.ideafinder.com/history/inventions/wheel.htm

The Evolution of the Wheel.
http://visual.ly/evolution-wheel-infographic